UAE Raids Shops While Australia Second Guesses Its Stance

UAE Raids Shops While Australia Second Guesses Its Stance

It's not unknown that Dubai is strict with alcohol and other drugs. What isn't clearly known by the public, however, is that Dubai do not allow e-cigarettes in the country.

Due to their being no import regulations, every e-cigarette currently in the country is considered "smuggled goods".

Anyone caught with any vaping products face criminal charges. Many tobacco shops have been raided recently, prompting others to remove e-cigarettes from their shelves and windows before they get fined.

Not all were lucky though. Seven retailers got caught and had their merchandise confiscated and destroyed. The Director at the Public Health & Safety department in Dubai Municipality mentioned that "as much as 100kg of tobacco was confiscated." 

It's not obvious if they actually confiscated tobacco for hookahs or if they include e-liquid in that data.

What's confusing many people, is the fact that as the raids finished there were still copious amounts of cigarettes lining the shelves and counters.

Are Australians Finding Their Way?

A committee created to look into vaping and the current data on the subject, came to a mixed conclusion. Their purpose was to figure out what regulations are recommended for the re-introduction of e-cigarettes into the marketplace.

The chairman eventually concluded that nicotine-use in vape devices should be permitted. He recommends the legalization of e-cigarettes and e-liquid, while putting the regulations, seen below, in place. The following was taken from AJP.com.au:

The majority of the Committee have adopted five recommendations, including:

  • A review of the evidence relating to the health impacts of e-cigarettes, to be updated every two years. Issues covered by the review would include: whether e-cigarettes can help people to quit smoking, the health effects of e-cigarette liquid (e-liquid) and long-term use of e-cigarettes, whether e-cigarettes could lead to more young people smoking and/or using nicotine, and the relative health impacts of e-cigarettes when compared to tobacco products.
  • An international meeting of health experts to discuss policy and legislative approaches to e-cigarettes.
  • A national approach to the regulation of non-nicotine e-cigarettes.
  • The Therapeutic Goods Administration’s continued role in classifying nicotine and assessing e-cigarettes.
  • Greater regulation of flavourings and colourings used in e-liquid.

In the dissenting report presented by Mr Zimmerman and Tim Wilson, the recommendations are that:

  • Nicotine used for e-cigarettes be made exempt from Schedule 7 of the Poisons Standard.
  • Legislation be passed to permit the sale and use of e-cigarettes containing nicotine with a regulatory framework for their sale and consumption based on standards found in the European Union and the United Kingdom.
  • A notification and assessment process for colour and flavourings used in e-cigarettes.

Dr Andrew Laming has also provided a dissenting report recommending that vaping be legalised.

 


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