Is Vaping Taken Seriously?

Is Vaping Taken Seriously?

Recently in Ottawa, during the National Non-Smoking Week, a debate was held to discuss effective methods and tactics of smoking cessation.

As it turns out, health groups that should have come forward to help build awareness in all areas of smoking cessation did not arrive. The panelists in support of vaping, that did show up, included a doctor, a researcher, a manufacturer and an e-cigarette user.

Invitations were sent to several individuals from key organizations that had attended a smoking cessation event just days before. Canadian Cancer Society and the Heart and Stroke Foundation were two of the names that came up. No one replied, however.

Many involved in the debate were not happy about the turn out, and it begs the question: Is vaping taken seriously by health organizations, as a whole?

If a person, let's call him Gary, sees their doctor and explains that after several attempts to quit smoking he was finally able to do it via e-cigarette use - the doctor would extend a "That's great!" or perhaps an "OK, keep doing what you're doing and I'll research a little more about vaping and the effects."

On an individual basis, we don't think a doctor would belittle vaping if it's helping his patient choose not to smoke.

If we step back and view the healthcare industry as a whole, and Gary went in front of a board of healthcare professionals - would he be taken seriously with the very same story?

Organizations generally carry the views of a small group of individuals at the head of the table. So, vaping advocates may have to try and get the message to the top of the ladder before we see any real changes.

If you'd like to read more about the debate, you can read Maria Papaioannoy-Duic's article here.


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